Ability Versus Trait Emotional Intelligence: Dual Influences on Adolescent Psychological Adaptation

Davis, Sarah K. and Humphrey, N. (2014) Ability Versus Trait Emotional Intelligence: Dual Influences on Adolescent Psychological Adaptation.

View this record at http://eprints.worc.ac.uk/3041/
Official URL: 10.1027/1614-0001/a000127

Abstract

Emotional intelligence (EI) is reliably associated with better mental health. A growing body of evidence suggests that EI acts as a protective buffer against some psychosocial stressors to promote adaptation. However, little is known about how the two principle forms of EI (trait and ability) work together to impact underlying stressor-health processes in adolescence. One thousand one hundred and seventy British adolescents (mean age = 13.03 years; SD = 1.26) completed a variety of standardized instruments assessing EI; coping styles; family dysfunction; negative life events; socioeconomic adversity; depression and disruptive behavior. Path analyses found that trait and ability EI work in tandem to modify the selection and efficacy of avoidant coping to influence the indirect effect of stressors on depression but not disruptive behavior. Nevertheless, actual emotional skill (ability EI) appears dependent on perceived competency (trait EI) to realize advantageous outcomes. Findings are evaluated and discussed with reference to theoretical and practical implications.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: BF Psychology
Members: University of Worcester
Depositing User: ULCC Admin
Date Deposited: 21 Mar 2014 01:31
Last Modified: 08 Nov 2016 13:14
URI: http://collections.crest.ac.uk/id/eprint/8039

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