Using grounded theory to explore the effects of behavioural changes in dementia on resident and carer relationships in a professional capacity besides other personal relationships the resident may have.

Appleton, Katie (2016) Using grounded theory to explore the effects of behavioural changes in dementia on resident and carer relationships in a professional capacity besides other personal relationships the resident may have. UNSPECIFIED thesis, UNSPECIFIED.

View this record at http://eprints.chi.ac.uk/1885/

Abstract

Background: The number of dementia diagnoses has been noted as increasing; this largely appears to be due to the fact we have an aging population. The issue has caused concern internationally in terms of the quality of care individuals receive. Aim: This research primarily investigated the impact of negative behaviours seen in dementia on a professional carer and resident relationship. Setting/Participants: Face-to-face interviews were carried out with 21 professional carers working in England in order to help understand the experiences of caring for individuals in a professional capacity – an otherwise neglected research area. The recruitment of participants was stopped when saturation was reached. The current study uses a grounded theory approach to largely investigate experiences of caring in this capacity but with a focus on behaviour and relationships. Results: With the analysis of the interviews a core category emerged: “Developing behaviour in dementia impacts relationships on a personal and professional level”. Thematic analysis identified three phases: 1. Display of negative behaviour, 2. Understanding, 3. Positive / Negative relationship change. Conclusions: The research suggests that in order to maintain good relationships with residents suffering with dementia, people need a good level of understanding of their behaviour. The participants identified deterioration in relationships between themselves as professional care assistants and the residents, between the residents and their family members and between residents themselves.

Item Type: Thesis
Keywords: BF Psychology
Members: University of Chichester
Depositing User: ULCC Admin
Date Deposited: 08 Nov 2016 13:01
Last Modified: 08 Nov 2016 13:01
URI: http://collections.crest.ac.uk/id/eprint/12153

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