Psychology's distorted view of actuality: cross-cultural differences in extreme and moderate response styles

Student, A. (2014) Psychology's distorted view of actuality: cross-cultural differences in extreme and moderate response styles. UNSPECIFIED thesis, UNSPECIFIED.

View this record at http://eprints.chi.ac.uk/1248/

Abstract

Are there really cross-cultural differences in how participants respond to questionnaires regardless of their content? Current research suggests that western cultures (i.e. England) are more likely to elicit a more extreme response style compared to eastern cultures (i.e. China). While eastern cultures have a higher tendency to respond moderately compared to western cultures. Well if this does happen, then why does it occur? This is the answer the current study aimed to answer by firstly measuring the cultural differences in response styles across 4 measures, and then see if the traits agreeableness and harmony could either predict response styles themselves or mediate cultures effect on response styles. The results supported that Chinese participants are more likely to elicit a moderate response style while British participants elicit a more extreme negative response style. Additionally, the present study is one of the first to explain the differences in response styles across east and west cultures through the mediation of agreeableness. These findings implicate that response biases (ERS and MRS) can no longer be ignored in cross-cultural psychology, and if left unaccounted for then cross-cultural psychology will continue to support conclusions based on a distorted view of actuality.

Item Type: Thesis
Keywords: BF Psychology
Members: University of Chichester
Depositing User: ULCC Admin
Date Deposited: 08 Nov 2016 13:00
Last Modified: 08 Nov 2016 13:00
URI: http://collections.crest.ac.uk/id/eprint/11728

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